Nepal Earthquake – experiences on the ground

I thought this might give you a sense of what it is like for some of the people I know in Nepal.    Unfortunately rain and thunder is in the forecast for the next few days.  But international aid is slowly arriving and as mentioned before, I have seen lots of evidence of the Nepalese helping themselves.

SIRC staff members Hasti (3rd right), Sonika (4th right) and Vocational Trainer (5th right) taking refuge under a tarp in Jorpati, Kathmandu.

SIRC staff members Hasti (3rd right), Sonika (4th right) and Vocational Trainer (5th right) taking refuge under a tarp in Jorpati, Kathmandu.

Giri Nabin, his wife, daughter and son in the makeshift shelter where they have spent the last two nights - in the wind & rain.  Giri is the manager of a hotel I stayed with for a night or two when I visited Kathmandu.

Giri Nabin, his wife, daughter and son in the makeshift shelter where they have spent the last two nights – in the wind & rain. Giri is the manager of a hotel I stayed with for a night or two when I visited Kathmandu.

Shree Krishna Dhital is a community leader I met while I live in Banepa last year.  Check out his blog here and the innovative work he is doing for his village, leveraging his engineering education.

After the earthquake struck, Shree checked with his wife to ensure she was OK and then got stuck into mobilizing the rescue operation in his village Phoolbari.  He has worked tirelessly since and in all the hype, has been sharing updates with a few of us.  Take a look.  Photos by Shree.

Shree's account of Phoolbari's loss:  Preliminary data for our VDC has shown 126 fully collapsed houses and 343 cracked houses and 3 deaths and some animal loss in ward 1,2,3,4,5 and 9.More data yet to come.

Shree’s account of Phoolbari’s loss: Preliminary data for our VDC has shown 126 fully collapsed houses and 343 cracked houses and 3 deaths and some animal loss in ward 1,2,3,4,5 and 9.More data yet to come.

Damage to one of the many homes in Phoolbari

Damage to one of the many homes in Phoolbari

A precious cow killed in the collapse of this home.  Her calf was saved.

A precious cow killed in the collapse of this home. Her calf was saved.

A destroyed bee hive in Phoolbari Village after the earthquake.

A destroyed bee hive in Phoolbari Village after the earthquake.

Before and after the earthquake.

Before and after the earthquake.

People taking shelter in an open field in Banepa

People taking shelter in an open field in Banepa

This looks to me like it is in Bhaktapur, on the edge of the highway to the east.  A meal of dal and rice.

This looks to me like it is in Bhaktapur, on the edge of the highway to the east. A meal of dal and rice.

Shree is working with Rotary International to commence fundraising to rebuild Phoolbari Village.  If you wish to support this initiative, please contact Shree through his blog.

On another note …..

Binay, one of the interns that I worked with at SIRC last year, sent a few photos of a demolished old city Bhaktapur.  I recognized one of the temples, and sure enough I have a photo of myself in front of this temple when Binay and Nikita took me on a foodie tour of Bhaktapur.  Take a look for yourself.

April 2014:  me standing at the foot of the  Nyatapola Temple in Bhaktapur.

April 2014: me standing at the foot of the Nyatapola Temple in Bhaktapur.

The photos of the  Nyatapola Temple in Bhaktapur that he sent me today.  Very sad.

The photos of the Nyatapola Temple in Bhaktapur that he sent me today. Very sad.

What I do not have is any contacts in the Langtang area, the epicentre of the earthquake.  Rescuers are only arriving there earlier today, it’s so remote.  Landslides abound there apparently, with few homes standing.  God help them.

About Kate Coffey

After 25+ years in the investment management industry, I packed in my job and spent 2014 living and working in Nepal and Bangladesh, and visited some other places in between. It took me on a journey I did not expect, had me fall in love with Nepal and it's people, and become inspired at the work of Spinal Injury Rehabilitation Centre (SIRC) located 2 hours east of Kathmandu in the Sanga foothills. Since 2014, I have continued my warm relationship with SIRC and worked closely with my friends there in the aftermath of the 2015 earthquakes to date. This blog initially started out as a travelogue of sorts to keep friends and family worldwide updated while I was off on my travels in 2014. Since then it has morphed into a life story of the many places I have lived and worked and of the wonderful people I have met along the way. I hope you enjoy.
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3 Responses to Nepal Earthquake – experiences on the ground

  1. kitkat611 says:

    Thanks for these updates Kate. Prayers for Nepal and its wonderful people.

  2. ffinlo says:

    That’s not the Nyatapola temple destroyed in the photo.

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