Nepalese doing it for themselves

I’ve noticed on the hourly news, the Nepal Earthquake news items tend to not really focus on the good news stories that demonstrate the determination of the Nepalese to survive, their innovation & creativity in solving problems with so few resources, and their sense of community and caring for one another.

Don’t get me wrong, the situation is dire – what is now 5 days after the quake (Nepal time), people continue to live in tents or under tarps in any open area as I write this.  There is an immediate need for shelter, food, water and basic hygiene supplies.  Hospitals need more medical professionals and medical supplies and equipment.

There is a huge need for international support, so keep your donations coming and ensure they are directed to the right organizations that are providing tangible help to the Nepalese.  A few things I consider when donating:

  • Donate cash.  Supplies are available locally and are cheaper in Nepal than in the western world.
  • Spending locally means supporting the local economy when it needs it most.
  • Donate to an organization you are familiar with and trust that the money you donate is spent locally and as intended.
  • Always ask what the cost of administration is.

While international support is critical, the Nepalese are also taking many steps to improve their lot.  These are a few examples that I have come across today on social media:

Building a public toilet in one of the shelter areas in Kathmandu

Building a public toilet in one of the shelter areas in Kathmandu

A greenhouse converted to shelter for over 20 people.

A greenhouse converted to shelter for over 20 people.

Empower Generation based in Lazimpat, Kathmandu giving directions to their offices.  They offer free recharging of mobile phones plus distribute free solar lights

Empower Generation based in Lazimpat, Kathmandu giving directions to their offices. They offer free recharging of mobile phones plus distribute free solar lights

A posting on facebook, hundreds of young men turned up to help.

A posting on facebook, hundreds of young men turned up to help.

Keeping the streets clean means less spread of disease.  A clean up crew active in Lalitpur, Kathmandu

Keeping the streets clean means less spread of disease. A clean up crew active in Patan, Kathmandu

Kids promoting the importance of cleanliness

Kids promoting the importance of cleanliness

Community meeting in Kavre, identifying their needs and coming up with plans

Community meeting in Kavre, identifying their needs and coming up with plans

It makes me proud to call many of these unsung heros, my friends.

About Kate Coffey

After 25+ years in the investment management industry, I packed in my job and spent 2014 living and working in Nepal and Bangladesh, and visited some other places in between. It took me on a journey I did not expect, had me fall in love with Nepal and it's people, and become inspired at the work of Spinal Injury Rehabilitation Centre (SIRC) located 2 hours east of Kathmandu in the Sanga foothills. Since 2014, I have continued my warm relationship with SIRC and worked closely with my friends there in the aftermath of the 2015 earthquakes to date. This blog initially started out as a travelogue of sorts to keep friends and family worldwide updated while I was off on my travels in 2014. Since then it has morphed into a life story of the many places I have lived and worked and of the wonderful people I have met along the way. I hope you enjoy.
This entry was posted in Nepal and tagged , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s