2015 ASCoN Conference – the 5th and final P is for Practice

It’s said practice makes perfect, and with this in mind, the 2015 ASCoN Conference decided to make good use of Prof.Wyndaele (Belgium) and Dr Apichana Kovindha (Thailand) being in Kathmandu for the conference.

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Prof. Wyndaele kicking off the Urodynamics practical workshop at SIRC.

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Dr Apichana Kovindha opening up the Urodynamics discussion on a real live case study

Prof. Wyndaele and Dr Apichana Kovindha are experts in urodynamics and so it made sense to take advantage of such expertise and schedule a post-conference workshop at SIRC for the staff.

If you are a non-medical person like me, you are probably wondering what is the purpose of urodynamics?  It’s to gain an understanding of what happens during bladder storage in a patient when the bladder fills and when it is supposed to be empty, whether volitionally or inappropriately and the problems which may lead to urinary incontinence.  Urodynamics helps get a better understanding of what is causing the patient’s symptoms and helps identify appropriate therapy.

Historically, urologic complications have been the major source of morbidity and mortality among spinal cord injured (SCI) patients. It’s recommended all SCI patients undergo urodynamic evaluation, with the initial urodynamics study done after the patient is beyond the spinal-shock phase. Management of the urinary tract in SCI individuals is recommended to be based on urodynamic principles and findings rather than on the neurologic history.

You can now see the importance of urodynamics evaluations throughout the rehabilitation and follow-up assessments for every SCI patient.  So important that ISCoS recently donated a urodynamics machine to SIRC to assist with bladder management of SCI patients.

How fortunate for SIRC to have Nepal’s 2nd only urodynamics machine in the country!  And because SIRC has NGO status, this means low-income SCI patients can avail of this evaluation without having to worry about payment.  The only other hospital with a urodynamics machine in Nepal is the privately-owned fee-paying B&B Hospital in Kathmandu.

Building on Prof.Wyndaele and Dr Apichana’s training, together with technical training from the urodynamics machine’s manufacturer, the plan is to ensure each SCI patient at SIRC receives an evaluation, thus allowing improved bladder management for all SIRC patients.  To date, a handful of patients have already benefited from an evaluation as the training progresses.

Deep appreciation to ISCoS for this important donation which not only provides our patients with enhanced rehabilitation care, but also improves the skills and expertise of the SIRC medical team.

About Kate Coffey

After 25+ years in the investment management industry, I packed in my job and spent 2014 living and working in Nepal and Bangladesh, and visited some other places in between. It took me on a journey I did not expect, had me fall in love with Nepal and it's people, and become inspired at the work of Spinal Injury Rehabilitation Centre (SIRC) located 2 hours east of Kathmandu in the Sanga foothills. Since 2014, I have continued my warm relationship with SIRC and worked closely with my friends there in the aftermath of the 2015 earthquakes to date. This blog initially started out as a travelogue of sorts to keep friends and family worldwide updated while I was off on my travels in 2014. Since then it has morphed into a life story of the many places I have lived and worked and of the wonderful people I have met along the way. I hope you enjoy.
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