Monsoon and weddings in Banepa

Yesterday I arrived out to this side of the Valley and made the mistake of walking home from the Spinal Centre at 3 o’clock in the afternoon, arriving to my apartment drenched with perspiration and red faced – I always was the glamorous one.

Weather here is hot and humid, 28C today but with humidity it measures as 36C.  Now I know some of you are considering I am a bit of a wimp if I am struggling with 36C but you have to remember I just came from Bowen Island at 20C with cool breezes a few days ago so it takes a little time to acclimatize.  Needless to say my hair is a curly mess (no, there are no photos!) but tomorrow I hope to time a hair wash with availability of electricity so I can blow dry my hair in an effort to tame it somewhat.

There’s been no monsoon rains since I first arrived in Nepal, but tomorrow through to Monday we are in for thunderstorms and much rain with risk of flooding.  Oh joy!  The last time it flooded in Banepa a few weeks ago, it looked like this.  The photos show the main entrance to the town from Kathmandu/Bhaktpur.  Let’s hope it’s not as bad this weekend ….

I moved into my rooms yesterday …..

View of the foothills from the window in my room

View of the foothills from one of the windows in my room

I unpacked pretty much everything today, hung pictures on the wall, set myself up to take care of light meals and have figured out the loadshedding schedule.

A little piece of Bowen Island here in Banepa, compliments of my family who commissioned this piece by Art by Di. The other two are meaningful cards I received just before I left (Bev and Carolyn). PS Sorry for the bad photo, it was taken in the dark, should have taken it earlier

A little piece of Bowen Island here in Banepa, compliments of my family who commissioned this piece by Art by Di in celebration of my 50th birthday recently. The other two are meaningful cards I received just before I left (Bev and Carolyn). PS Sorry for the bad photo, it was taken in the dark, should have taken it earlier

Banepa is in Group 7 so we have no electricity for 11 hours per day.  I am only grateful there is electricity throughout most of the night as that means I can run the fan while I sleep.

The times in the schedule are the times we don’t have electricity. AT least there is a schedule that is pretty much kept to!

The times in the schedule are the times we don’t have electricity. AT least there is a schedule that is pretty much kept to!

The last three days have been auspicious days for marriages and every where I turn, there is some or other wedding groups dancing their way along the street to the wedding banquet hall.  I managed to capture one such parade this evening from my balcony.  The brass band sound much better than my camera could capture.

Brass band at the wedding coming round the bend from the banquet hall in behind.

Brass band at the wedding coming round the bend from the banquet hall in behind.

Dancing in the street!

Dancing in the street!

The wedding car all decked out

The wedding car all decked out

And finally video footage – 1:40mins duration. You’ll notice the women are the primary dancers with a few brave young fellas joining in.  But for the most part the men keep themselves rather proper in their smart attire.

You may have to turn your monitor sideways for a perfect view but you can still get a good view if you don’t.  I realize upon looking at the video again, the road out front is pretty rocky!  You’ll notice the car being jolted around a bit, and the wedding guests are carefully picking their way through the ruts and stones in their finery.  It’s been this way since I first came here but apparently it is being prepared for black-topping (tarmac-ing).  I’ll believe it when I see it.

About Kate Coffey

After 25+ years in the investment management industry, I packed in my job and spent 2014 living and working in Nepal and Bangladesh, and visited some other places in between. It took me on a journey I did not expect, had me fall in love with Nepal and it's people, and become inspired at the work of Spinal Injury Rehabilitation Centre (SIRC) located 2 hours east of Kathmandu in the Sanga foothills. Since 2014, I have continued my warm relationship with SIRC and worked closely with my friends there in the aftermath of the 2015 earthquakes to date. This blog initially started out as a travelogue of sorts to keep friends and family worldwide updated while I was off on my travels in 2014. Since then it has morphed into a life story of the many places I have lived and worked and of the wonderful people I have met along the way. I hope you enjoy.
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7 Responses to Monsoon and weddings in Banepa

  1. George says:

    Looks like fun! Good to hear you arrived safely and are settling in. Love the artwork!
    Have you considered picking up a portable solar array? They are quite cheap and will keep your fan running as needed.
    Rainy and overcast here in Vancouver.
    Good luck!

    • Kate Coffey says:

      Good idea George, but this is a ceiling fan and is not connected to the UPS. I could buy a stand alone fan and plug it into the UPS, I’ll see how I fare – it’s early days yet. Hope you are not working too hard!!

  2. Bill G says:

    Thanks, Kate: Very glad toy know that you made it safely. You actually left a deluge here as well, although it calmed down about mid-day on Saturday. Not nearly as hot as last year at this time. Take good care. Bill xo

    On Wed, Jul 13, 2016 at 8:46 AM, Bowen to Bangladesh wrote:

    > Kate Coffey posted: “Yesterday I arrived out to this side of the Valley > and made the mistake of walking home from the Spinal Centre at 3 o’clock in > the afternoon, arriving to my apartment drenched with perspiration and red > faced – I always was the glamorous one. Weather he” >

  3. Grace Coffey says:

    Great to hear you are settling in well! I love the picture – really looks vibrant and wants to be looked at! Stay safe in all that Monsoon rain gxx

  4. Judi says:

    the women look gorgeous and the men are rather plain. and the women seem to be having more fun, the men rather staid. interesting!! I wonder if it is significant. all wonder-ful. enjoy & stay dry.

    • Kate Coffey says:

      Yes, the women are beautiful. For weddings they bring out their best saris and jewelry, get all made up and do up their hair. Even in this monsoon weather they look poised and unflappable whereas I am pink and perspiring. The grey and black is typical for the men – formal attire and very handsome!

  5. Mick Canning says:

    Life goes on despite everything that has happened. So good to see. And glad you arrived safely.

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